New practical guide, from the National Association of Funeral Directors, The Bereavement Advice Centre and Simplify, to support the bereaved:

“What to do when someone dies”

The National Association of Funeral Directors (NAFD) has joined forces with probate advice service Simplify and the Bereavement Advice Centre to create a practical guide to support the bereaved, in the first few days and weeks after a death, entitled: “What to do when someone dies”.

The free guide sets out each step in the process, from how a death is confirmed and how to register it, to which organisations need to be advised of the death, how to arrange a funeral, finding out about probate and what to do if the person wishes their organs or tissue be donated for transplant.

The guide explains why a post mortem may be necessary, what an inquest is and any instances where the law differs from England in Scotland and Northern Ireland.

The guide is available from Coroner’s Offices, GP practices, Citizens Advice Bureaux and funeral homes which are members of the NAFD.

There is also Freephone number that users of the guide can call for further advice.

Alan Slater, Chief Executive of the National Association of Funeral Directors, said:
“The NAFD recognises how difficult and confusing the loss of someone can be, for those left behind. It is usually only when a death occurs that most people learn about the process involved and it is already a traumatic-enough time without them also having to worry about whether they are following the right steps.
“This free guide is designed to help people at this tough time and offer simple guidance and advice that they can follow.”

Anne Wadey, Head of the Bereavement Advice Centre, added “It’s a privilege to be in partnership with the NAFD given its members’ commitment to excellent service to bereaved families. We share those values and, like funeral directors, we are here to support families in making informed choices and decisions. Each of our callers is asked ‘how can we help?’ so that what we say is tailored to their unique individual circumstances.”